Holiday Scams That Santa Is Asking You To Be Aware Of Please!!!

Santa Claus has had enough of us humans behaving badly. He wonders whether we’ll ever grow up and realize that we were expected to be on the lookout for Christmas scams at some time. Maybe it’s not just shops and buyers who are getting ready for the holidays. Scammers are as well. In fact, during the Christmas season, the risk of fraud usually increases that’s why identity proofing needs. Secret shopper scams, Christmas phishing scams, and other popular holiday frauds should all be avoided this time of year. Please be wary of the following Christmas frauds, as requested by Santa:

1. Social Media Ads That Aren’t Truthful:

You may notice products for sale from a small company as you read through your social media stream. To entice you to place a purchase, the company may pretend to support a charity or provide a free trial. Scammers aim to trick consumers into paying for products they never receive.

2. Gift Swaps on Social Media:

A modern variation of this con involves trading bottles of wine. “Secret Santa Dog” has a twist in that you must purchase a $10 present for your “secret dog”. It’s also a pyramid scam, which is against the law. Victims are duped into giving over their private info, as well as that of their relatives and friends, and into buying and sending presents or money to strangers in all of these forms.

3. Apps for the Holidays:

Some of the holiday-themed apps are available on Apple’s App Store and Google Playlist. Apps may play a bigger role this Christmas season than last year. Free applications, in particular, should be avoided since they often contain more advertising. Malware may be found in free programs.

4. Account Compromise Alerts: 

Victims get an email, phone call, or text message informing them that suspicious activity has been detected on one of their accounts and urging them to take quick action to prevent the account from being hacked. Unsolicited phone calls, emails, and text messages should be avoided at all costs.

5. Gift Cards for Free:

Do not respond to an unsolicited email offering gift cards. Scammers imitate real organizations like Starbucks in some of these communications. On the off chance that you’ve gotten the mail, don’t tap any of the links in it. Rather than marking it as spam, mark it as junk mail.

6. Seasonal Holiday Jobs:

Shippers and delivery firms are among the top holiday employees this year. These jobs are a terrific way to earn some additional cash, and they can occasionally lead to long-term work opportunities. Job searchers should be wary of employment scams that try to steal money and personal information.

7. Websites That Look Alike: 

During the Christmas season, you’ll receive a barrage of emails advertising discounts, specials, and bargains. Be aware of emails that include links. Scammers may use lookalike websites to deceive visitors into installing malware, making pointless purchases, or exposing personal information. If you’re not sure what the email is about, don’t click any of the links. Hover over them instead to see where they redirect.

8. Fake Non-Profit Organizations:

Many charities have had to postpone their typical fundraising activities and awareness efforts owing to the COVID-19 outbreak, and are now asking people to donate online. Fake charity and scam artists posing as individuals in need should be avoided by donors. Don’t give to unidentified organizations on the spur of the moment. Tomorrow, as much as today, responsible organizations will appreciate your contribution.

9. Must-Have Holiday Gifts: 

Luxury products, jewelry, designer apparel, and electronics that are inexpensive or absurdly priced are nearly invariably cheap knockoffs and counterfeits. When acquiring these high-value things from people on social media, use extreme caution.

10. Scams involving puppies: 

Many families, particularly those with children, may want to explore bringing a pet into their home this year. You might, however, become a victim of a pet scam, which has been more common this year. Before making a purchase, ask to view the pet in person.

Finally, I would Say:

During the Christmas season, the risk of fraud and identity theft usually increases therefore KYC verification is important. Scammers aim to trick consumers into paying for products they never receive. “Secret Santa Dog” has a twist in that you must purchase a $10 present for your “secret dog”. Both the Apple App Store and Google Playlist have holiday-themed apps. Examine the privacy policies to determine what data will be gathered.

Free applications, in particular, should be avoided since they often contain more advertising than apps that cost a little charge. Be aware of websites that look like legitimate charities and non-profit organizations. Luxury products, jewelry, designer apparel, and electronics are cheap knockoffs and counterfeits. Don’t give to unidentified organizations on the spur of the moment; responsible organizations will appreciate a contribution today.

See Also: December Global Holidays

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